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New Mexico (DO)

New Mexico Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners

New-Mexico-Medical-License2550 Cerrillos Road, 2nd Floor
Santa Fe, NM  87505
P. O Box 25101
Santa Fe, NM  87504

Phone: (505) 476-4950
Fax: (505) 476-4645
Web: http://www.rld.state.nm.us/osteopathy/index.html
Board Administrator: Liz Z. Montoya


Fees:

  • Application Fee: $400
  • Background Check Fee : N/A
  • License Renewal: $200

Timeline:

  • Application process: 6-12 weeks minimum
  • Board Meetings: Files are not required to go to a Board meeting. Once the file is complete, the Board will issue a license within approximately 15 days of approval.

What you need to know:

  • Expiration: Applications expire after 1 year from the date it is received by the Board.
  • Interview: Required for applicants with any disciplinary action in their history. They will be requested to appear at the next scheduled Board meeting.

Eligibility Requirements:

  • USMLE Attempt Limit: N/A
  • USMLE Time Limit: N/A.
  • PGY (AMG): 1 Year
  • PGY (IMG): N/A
  • SPEX/COMVEX: Not required.

Order your New Mexico DO Medical License here:

     
About New Mexico:

New Mexico is located in the southwest and western regions of the United States. New Mexico is also usually considered one of the Mountain States. With a population density of 16 per square mile, New Mexico is the sixth-most sparsely inhabited U.S. state. The New Mexican landscape ranges from wide, rose-colored deserts to broken mesas to high, snow-capped peaks. Despite New Mexico’s arid image, heavily forested mountain wildernesses cover a significant portion of the state, especially towards the north. The Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the southernmost part of the Rocky Mountains, run roughly north-south along the east side of the Rio Grande in the rugged, pastoral north. The most important of New Mexico’s rivers are the Rio Grande, Pecos, Canadian, San Juan, and Gila. The Rio Grande is tied for the fourth longest river in the U.S.

Inhabited by Native American populations for many centuries, it has also been part of the Imperial Spanish viceroyalty of New Spain, part of Mexico, and a U.S. territory. Among U.S. states, New Mexico has the highest percentage of Hispanics, including descendants of Spanish colonists and recent immigrants from Latin America. It also has the third-highest percentage of Native Americans, after Alaska and Oklahoma, and the fifth-highest total number of Native Americans after California, Oklahoma, Arizona, and Texas. The tribes in the state consist of mostly Navajo and Pueblo peoples. As a result, the demographics and culture of the state are unique for their strong Hispanic and Native American influences. The flag of New Mexico is represented by the red and gold colors, which represent Spain as well as the Zia symbol, an ancient Native American symbol for the sun.

New Mexico provides a number of economic incentives to businesses operating in the state, including various types of tax credits and tax exemptions. Most of the incentives are based on job creation. New Mexico is the third leading crude oil and natural gas producer in the United States. The Permian Basin (part of the Mid-Continent Oil Field) and San Juan Basin lie partly in New Mexico. In 2006 New Mexico accounted for 3.4% of the crude oil, 8.5% of the dry natural gas, and 10.2% of the natural gas liquids produced in the United States. In 2000 the value of oil and gas produced was $8.2 billion.

* This excerpt is taken from Wikipedia. For further information on the History, Geography, Climate, Politics, & Culture of New Mexico, click here.

Resources:

Everything you need to know about New Mexico: http://www.newmexico.gov
Need help relocating to New Mexico?: http://www.unitedvanlines.com
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