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18 Oct 2018

How Intermountain Healthcare is Moving the Needle on Virtual Care

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Treating patients locally, rather than making them travel hundreds of miles for care, was a core driver for Intermountain’s new virtual care initiative

 

In March, Salt Lake City, Utah-based Intermountain Healthcare announced the launch of one of the nation’s largest virtual hospital services, bringing together 35 telehealth programs and more than 500 caregivers to enable patients to receive remote medical care.

 

 

 

 

The virtual hospital, called Intermountain Connect Care Pro, provides basic medical care as well as advanced services, such as stroke evaluation, mental health counseling, intensive care, and newborn critical care. “While it doesn’t replace the need for on-site caregivers, it supplements existing staff and provides specialized services in rural communities where those types of medical care usually aren’t readily available,” officials said in the March announcement.

 

 

Michael Phillips, M.D., Intermountain’s chief of clinical and outreach services, says that a core reason why the health system went in this “virtual” direction was because its leaders saw the evolving healthcare landscape and wanted to get out in front of it. “Our thought process behind this was that the world has changed from the days where you can only take care of people who [physically] make it to you. But literally every person on the planet is pretty much within the distance of a cell tower now. So we feel people should be able to benefit from [remote] care,” says Phillips.

 

 

Offering an example of how these services work in the clinical setting, Intermountain officials brought up the instance of an infant at a southern Utah hospital who was being supported via Connect Care Pro services and received a critical care consultation that allowed the sick baby to stay in that facility instead of being transferred to a newborn intensive care unit (ICU) in Salt Lake City. This single avoided transfer would have cost over $18,000 dollars. The parents of this baby were able to remain in their community, surrounded by their support system, instead of traveling what would have amounted to 400 miles and seven hours round-trip every time they wanted to see their baby, noted officials.

 

Indeed, as Phillips puts it, when most rural hospitals think about big health systems, their vision is a helicopter scooping in and flying away from the rural facility with its complicated patient. “But we believe that many of those patients can be treated locally, and there are clear benefits to that. First off, it’s better for the patient—having their family separated by 200 miles to drive to a major medical center is not good for their care and doesn’t tallow for a good support system. If they can be treated locally, they should be,” he attests.

 

As of now, notes Phillips, Intermountain’s virtual care services—inclusive of the Connect Care Pro, which is a direct provider-to-provider service and Connect Care, which is a direct-to-consumer service—covers all of the health system’s hospitals and another nine facilities outside of the system. “We are really covering more than 30 ICUs in all, and we have a stroke service, a neonatal resuscitation service, and [other services]. Our tele-ICU services are covering a few hundred beds with this process,” Phillips explains.

 

 

Original: https://www.healthcare-informatics.com/article/telemedicine/musc-telehealth-leaders-share-their-roadmap-success

 

Reposted by Physician Licensing Services

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